What ww2 soldiers ate?

What ww2 soldiers ate?

At first, the meals were stews, and more varieties were added as the war went on, including meat and spaghetti in tomato sauce, chopped ham, eggs and potatoes, meat and noodles, pork and beans; ham and lima beans, and chicken and vegetables.

How did Japanese treat American prisoners of war?

The treatment of American and allied prisoners by the Japanese is one of the abiding horrors of World War II. Prisoners were routinely beaten, starved and abused and forced to work in mines and war-related factories in clear violation of the Geneva Conventions.

What diseases did the American POWs face?

Malaria and dysentery were especially common, with most POWs experiencing several attacks each year of captivity.

Which Old World disease was the deadliest?

The deadliest of these diseases was Smallpox, it was said it killed more then 50% of the native population.

How did diseases affect the Native American tribes?

Native Americans suffered 80-90% population losses in most of America with influenza, typhoid, measles and smallpox taking the greatest toll in devastating epidemics that were compounded by the significant loss of leadership.

How many natives were killed by European diseases?

European colonizers killed so many indigenous Americans that the planet cooled down, a group of researchers concluded. Following Christopher Columbus’ arrival in North America in 1492, violence and disease killed 90% of the indigenous population — nearly 55 million people — according to a study published this year.

How many Native Americans are left?

Today, there are over five million Native Americans in the United States, 78% of whom live outside reservations: California, Arizona and Oklahoma have the largest populations of Native Americans in the United States.

Who gave blankets with smallpox?

In 1851, Francis Parkman was the first historian to document Lord Amherst’s “shameful plan” to exterminate Indians by giving them smallpox-in- fected blankets taken from the corpses of British soldiers at Fort Pitt in 1763 (Parkman 1991:646–651).

Did the British spread smallpox?

The account of the British infecting Natives with smallpox during Pontiac’s War of 1763 originated with nineteenth century historian Francis Parkman.